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Long Time Passing

 

Some time ago, when we were fledgling lovers, existing in the protective bubble reserved for the newly amorous,  Two Brains brought me to a place called Vassieux-en-Vercors.  The drive up from Grenoble is littered with sombre reminders of a time, only decades ago when the spectacular landscape played backdrop for the most merciless realities of a world at war – we stopped at various places, never idly.  Here it is impossible to forget how cruel and cold humanity can be.   Here no bubble is sufficient to protect you from nauseating emotions wrought from the darkest, starkest of realites.

Vassieux sits on the Drôme side of le Vercors.  The Vercors is nicknamed ‘the flat iron’ for a reason … it is a high plateau with higher peaks frilling it, thrilling visitors  and chilling those that know the secrets that it keeps.  Mountains tend to do that.  They look, are, so magnificent but they are unyielding, unforgiving places by default without being privy and council to the Résistance called le maquis in a brutal global war.  Huge harsh lumps they are – they don’t actually ask for delicate humans to impinge on them but sometimes flimsy mortals have no choice.

The war, that war of 1939-45 invited such necessity.  Men whose country was overtaken by a callous regime they did not invite nor condone, who wanted it freed and reverted to the values it held dear, who did not want the uneasy treaty of Vichy but rather actual and total freedom, those men, those women for can we just agree that men and women are equally people, those people formed the Résistance.  And the ones who under that same treaty were told they had to go and do work in Germany.  STO it was called (Service de Travail Obligatoire … I don’t honestly think you need my translation) – those young men, they said non and they joined the Résistance.

What happened in 1944 was disgraceful.  Not simply by dint of the deeds of the enemy (German in this case) but actually and tragically because of the behavior of the high fallutin’ tootin’ allied commanders.  Another time.  Really another time I will feel fully equipped to tell the story.  In the meantime all you need take to heart is that this village, and all the others barborously besieged, is a defenseless duck sitting pretty on a flat plane.  That it can’t have been difficult to overpower it, however hard les maquis tried to fend  off the merciless assault is painfully, graphically clear.  And there are references to the places they fought  and fell all around and not just here, throughout this great monolith known as le Vercors.  Villages burned,  Villagers slain. Men rounded up and annihilated standing proud against cold walls in the place they called home because it was.  Their home.    It is not pretty.  Not at all.  It is tough beyond the bounds of that pathetically soft word.  And then you visit the Nécropole and you  walk, sapped of strength, sorrow wrenching bile from your throat among the bare little crosses, pure white standing proud in pristine gravel and you pathetically collapse as though a razor has slashed your heart because you are facing a family – a grandmother, her two daughters and all the children of one of them including a baby lying side by side, their lives extinguished mercilessly.   Every single one of them.   See it, feel it and tell me, tell me not to weep.

My husband  had the immense privilige of spending time some years ago, with Robert Favier (known as Mattres) who was created Chevalier de Légion d’Honneur having been a high ranking leader in the Maquis.  Monsieur Favier,  died in 2010 aged 96.  HB2 also met Joseph la Picirella who founded the original museum in Vassieux.  He made it because he could and because no-one should forget what happened.  Really no-one should.  He also died in 2010 aged 85, he was little more than a boy, therefore, when he joined the Maquis.  His museum is still there where he built it, just behind the church.  The French Government built another museum, the official museum, which sits perched 400 metres above the village and is of deliberately austere design.

To walk the walk I walked, in the footsteps of those braver than brave maquis was humbling.  A privilege beyond privilege.  And here are some photos.  Because my words are meagre and poor.  I will leave you to imagine it for yourself or simply to enjoy the beauty of the place.  The choice is yours.  Mine is not to tell people what to do, simply to bring you to a place that savages my senses and of which, when I am confident that my thoughts and facts are accurate and well-founded, I will write in greater depth.

PS:  When you have digested the place, when you have taken it all in your sturdy stride, you might answer me a simple question.  What did we learn?  Because from where I am standing, sitting, lying down on a bed of flowers, nothing has changed.   When will we learn to leave well alone?  When will greed release it’s toxic grip on humanity?  When?  Can I have it now please?   Because little girls picking flowers should NOT be perpetuating a scenario that ends in their husbands pushing up daisies for the sake of yet another bloody war.  When will we ever learn?

104 Comments Post a comment
  1. I visited it many years ago with my mother who had lived through the war. It left a huge impression on me, the cruelty of mankind towards others. I will never forget it.

    Liked by 4 people

    March 15, 2017
    • To visit with your mother who had lived through that ghastly time must have made it an even more acute experience. It is, indeed unforgettable

      Liked by 3 people

      March 15, 2017
  2. This is heart-wrenching, both pictures and words and the deep deep sorrow and bewilderment therein. These people were brave beyond belief, not because they chose to be but because they had to be, they should never be forgotten nor the forces that led to such barbarity.

    Liked by 3 people

    March 15, 2017
    • Every word you write pricks tears

      Liked by 2 people

      March 15, 2017
    • Hate this phone… trigger happy it is. I was trying to say your comment is extremely pertinent and moving. Thank you ☺

      Liked by 2 people

      March 15, 2017
      • I was fighting back tears reading it. My dad was in the navy during the War and I grew up watching war films. I became interested in history, read the War Poets and did courses right up to my 50s and I still don’t understand it. Oh I understand the grievances and how easy it is to manipulate people who feel powerless and poor, but I will never understand the desire to do so, the sheer evil, the hate, the greed that led to so many lives destroyed and that continue to be affected. And I don’t understand how it is being played out again, despite all that we know.

        Liked by 2 people

        March 15, 2017
      • Jumped over from the Senior Salon
        ~~~~~~~~~~~
        Well said, and my sentiments exactly.

        May they finally touch the hearts of the American president and all who support his hateful comments and fan that flame – especially in Congress. Hate, greed, intolerance, racial prejudice, cruelty – and far too many who are content to “wait and see” until it effects them personally.

        Important and impactful post, and beautifully written, Osyth. Thanks for sharing – but I couldn’t listen to Seeger’s Flowers – already in tears and shaking.
        xx,
        mgh
        (Madelyn Griffith-Haynie – ADDandSoMuchMORE dot com)
        ADD Coach Training Field founder; ADD Coaching co-founder
        “It takes a village to educate a world!”

        Liked by 1 person

        March 16, 2017
      • Those who feel, those who have wise heads, those are the people who must step carefully, thoughtfully and without hatred up to the plate and say ENOUGH. Every word in this comment resonates. Go peacefully but never lose that spirit xx

        Liked by 3 people

        March 17, 2017
      • Hate breeds hate. It takes an exceptionally loving heart, and a great deal of resolve, to stand firm in the face of it and respond in a manner that fosters change. Some days I’m up to it, other days I simply must walk away, trying not to shake my head (until I’m out of view – lol)
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 2 people

        March 17, 2017
      • Walking away is my plan B too …. some days we are not bulletproof that’s for sure xxx

        Liked by 2 people

        March 18, 2017
      • Many too many days since last November, unfortunately.

        But if I can’t respond calmly and without make-wrong, I know it’s not a good idea to say anything at all. I don’t want to be responsible for instigating a defensive reaction that will make it all that much more difficult for them to take an open-minded look and change their minds.
        xx, mgh

        Liked by 2 people

        March 18, 2017
      • Many years ago, my boss who I regard as my mentor cautioned me against being too reactionary if I wanted to succeed. I carry his words at the front of my mind since I am naturally a passionate soul and try to be considered and responsive or simply hold my tongue and have a fictional and pithy conversation in my head. The events of last year have tested the theory to the limit and I know I am not alone in finding it hard not to be gladiatorial xx

        Liked by 1 person

        March 18, 2017
      • Gladiatorial – lol – great way to describe my native setting as well. When I first began coaching, it took me over a year of practice to get what the coaching field describes as “charge neutral” into my genes.

        I’m with you on “to the limit” recently. With what’s going on politically here in America, I’m sorely tested MOST days anymore – with every new tweet, appointment or announcement from Agent Orange.

        Cutting funding for medical and climate science research by millions – IS HE BRAIN DEAD?
        xx,
        mgh

        Like

        March 18, 2017
      • No brain at all, I rather feel. XX

        Liked by 1 person

        March 18, 2017
      • Slapped upside the head repeatedly as a child perhaps?
        xx, mgh

        Liked by 1 person

        March 18, 2017
      • Shame they don’t revert to that method with him now xx

        Liked by 1 person

        March 19, 2017
      • I doubt it would matter now – nothing seems to change what he is determined to do.
        xx,
        mgh

        Liked by 1 person

        March 19, 2017
      • Osyth you know I can’t stay out of this discussion… Other than to let off steam, repeating the words of cruelty given so freely by DT doesn’t place us any closer to a resolution.
        DT and his DT’s (See, I did it. Get it.) respond to challenges. Set up a challenge he can’t refuse. Set up a challenge he would have to lose to look good. Work to change the government within the government. Remember Congress’s sit-in. There was no followup. Love Always…

        Like

        March 20, 2017
  3. I didn’t know about the cruel history of the vercours, thank you seems an odd expression but without your piece i would still be ignorant. Maybe that is part of the answer you are searching for? Keep retelling the horror stories, keep reminding people of what has gone before and will happen again unless we guard against it?

    Liked by 2 people

    March 15, 2017
  4. When will we ever learn? A beautiful post, yet horrible time in the history of the world. Your posts – your words Osyth, always written with your heart. Wishing your week is full of sunshine and warmth.

    Like

    March 15, 2017
    • Hi dear Osyth, I have nominated you with the #MyFirstPostRevisited challenge. You are in no way obligated to participate. Hope you have a great weekend.
      https://spearfruit.com/2017/03/17/myfirstpostrevisited/

      Liked by 1 person

      March 18, 2017
      • Thank you …. I’m away with no WiFi til Monday night but I’ll check it out then ☺sorry for being quiet but difficult when only equipped with a phone- I do hope you are doing well and that spring has sprung properly in Florida now 🌸🌹🌼⚘🌱

        Liked by 1 person

        March 18, 2017
  5. Not a post to “like” but one to acknowledge. I cannot begin to fathom or empathise with how those in an occupied country cope.
    We have some local history I would like to write more about in the future but I am nervous of being seen as an interloper.
    It’s all a tough call isn’t it?

    Liked by 1 person

    March 15, 2017
    • Acknowledge is right and not forget. I can’t empathise, of course I can’t … I wasn’t there. But I can feel and I can pass the feeling on to good people like you who are sensitive and intelligent enough not to let these things sink into oblivion. In terms of writing about local history. I think so long as one always acknowledges that one is Foreign (and you would be foreign if you came from Brittany or Picardie in this context 😉) then you are actually revering your neighbours not intruding on their story. I have just had a wonderful comment on my FaceBook Page where these posts automatically post from a Frenchman who I know to be extremely educated and cultured saying how much he had enjoyed the piece written and that my English voice resonated with him (he is bi-lingual which could have helped a little). Go for it, tread decorously and you won’t go wrong. X

      Liked by 1 person

      March 15, 2017
      • I will tell some stories. It’s in my nature. But first, my grandson and I are writing a book ostensibly aimed at 10-13 year olds (his choice) which I wil illustrate and he will donate caustically critical comment on. It will be set in our village .
        He’s a big reader

        Like

        March 15, 2017
  6. Thank you.

    Like

    March 15, 2017
  7. lindywhitton #

    Stark reminder of old horrors written on an ancient and beautiful landscape.

    Liked by 1 person

    March 15, 2017
  8. The Vercors was the biggest maquis of France, counting up to 4000 men against the German final assault . Most of them were were FTPs, Francs-Tireurs et Partisans, the bulk of the Resistance whose watchword was “De la résistance à la révolution”, from the Resistance to the Revolution .Which certainly explains why neither the US not the French Provisional government didn’t try hard to save them (Stalin did the same thing for the Warsaw insurrection) .
    There is a wonderful documentary film made by Patrick Rotman, “ÉTÉ 44” I highly recommend, .fascinating footages I never imagined that could exist, mainly amateur made . There were stunning scenes from the Vercors, and it was moving to see these peasants with berets, these workers with caps, shooting with their hunting rifles the German troops climbing up the slopes .Eventually the Germans had to use their paratroops after an intense bombing to get the victory .
    If you like, here is the song of these people, my favourite by far . Beautiful music, beautiful poetry :
    “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lvjASyf9Fw”.
    Another version with written visible lyrics : “https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUZWlf_vuKg&list=RDsUZWlf_vuKg” .

    Liked by 1 person

    March 15, 2017
    • Thank you so much for this …. I am grateful for all the information and particularly will try and find that film …. surely essential viewing if one truly wants to learn, which I do. The song will have to wait til I’m home on Tuesday. I know it will be worth the wait and I thank you so much for sharing it with me 🙂

      Like

      March 17, 2017
  9. The Jewish tradition believes that as long as there are 36 righteous people in the world evil is kept at bay. I am sure that many of those 36 died in that majestic but heartbreaking area.

    Liked by 2 people

    March 15, 2017
    • Bernadette my apomovies for the late response … I am away with little internet. Your comment breaks my fragile heart but I thank you for effecting me so because I do believe it is being conscious of how close to falling into an inferno of evil we really are that at least gives voice to some and in turn some tiny hope that others may listen.

      Liked by 1 person

      March 17, 2017
  10. Pan #

    The answer to your question is, nothing..
    Greed will always rise to the top of the food chain.. And I mean that literally.. Those who happily embrace greed, make it their passion to have “The most marbles in the end”, will cheat, lie, murder and steal the clothes from your back and food from your mouth, if they see it as power and/or wealth or a threat.. Greed has no borders and only uneasy alliances..
    It’s a weakness most can’t overcome in themselves, or even have the notion to change.. The it takes inner strength to not move, to the dark side.. Part of it is self preservation, I think.. It becomes a cancer of the soul when self preservation and individual goals turn to greedy passion to have more than others, no matter who is trodden over..
    The pictures are sadly beautiful.. Not bittersweet.. Very sad in the beauty the landscape hangs on to in spite of human violence.

    Liked by 4 people

    March 15, 2017
    • Sadly I know every word you speak is true but it doesn’t stop me wanting to at least write from my heart. It’s all I can do. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      March 17, 2017
      • Pan #

        Every word true.. But that just answers your question.. There is more to this world than greed and the horrors that follow it.. If there wasn’t, what would be the point in living ?
        I purposely only answered the question, just to see.. The two things I expected did happen.. 1st, that people would respond with tears, hope and thanks to you for the post.. And the 2nd, your response.. Or rather what it lacked.. People were and are uplifted with your posts, no matter if it’s humor, sadness or enlightening.. Your passion comes blazing thru and sometimes I think you miss that you are one of the lights twinkling in this otherwise murky mass of humanity that wishes to gobble up all in its path.. Many of your readers are lights in their own right too..
        The question that this post brings to my mind isn’t about humanity ever changing.. But how many lights will I be fortunate enough to cross paths with in my lifetime ?
        The world can keep it’s material crap and whoever wants to have the most marbles can have them all..
        Your blog and many others are what makes being online worthwhile, in spite of the garbage that laces the web.. Being one of the lights in the world seems in my mind, your tailor made purpose in life, and that is also every word true 😊

        Liked by 2 people

        March 17, 2017
      • I’m away at Maison Catastrophe with no WI-FI…. Will converse properly when I’m back in Grenoble ☺

        Liked by 1 person

        March 18, 2017
      • Pan #

        Maison Catastrophe, a project of change 💛

        Liked by 1 person

        March 18, 2017
      • It sure is! 😨

        Like

        March 18, 2017
  11. There is a lot of heart and love in this horrible post. How contra-dictionary it may sound. Thank you for writing about it.

    Liked by 2 people

    March 15, 2017
    • You always get right to what I’m trying g to say my dear friend. What happened was unforgivable but if we can allow ourselves to feel even decades afterwards and vow that we will never condone such things and share our feelings with feeling then we have some chance of infecting the hearts of others to stand resolutely for peace and against greed too. I have to believe that … it’s all I can do 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      March 17, 2017
  12. Beautifully and powerfully written. Can I reblog this for my Friday posting please? If I can find out how to do it!

    Liked by 3 people

    March 15, 2017
    • Thank you … And of course you can repost it – I’m delighted that you want to. I’m sure there is a simple way but I’m afraid I have no clue 😕

      Like

      March 15, 2017
    • Pan #

      Next to the “like” button on the post, there is a reblog button.. Clicking that will allow you to reblog and the comment box that also pops up let’s you type your thoights about the blog/post you are reblogging.. Hope this helps..

      Liked by 2 people

      March 16, 2017
  13. I, too, want my share of peace now. When we were in France a few years ago, we stood on the beaches of Normandy. It was peaceful that day. children were running along the sand and into the ocean. I couldn’t help but think that that ocean and that beach had once been filled with blood. Truly, when will we ever learn? Touching post which brings out so many feelings and unanswered questions. Have a peaceful day, my friend.

    Liked by 3 people

    March 15, 2017
    • Normandy makes ones heart burst with sorrow even on sunny days full of childish laughter. The Vercors has that same chilling effect. The effect of innocence annihilated. Peace is the one thing I will never give up on though the evidence continues to point to disappointment 🙁

      Liked by 2 people

      March 16, 2017
  14. When history is taught in a text book format, it can be indifferent and there only to be memorized.
    When a story in history is told with a loving heart that honors the people, the events and humanity, that storyteller will leave a memory that can never be forgotten. So lasting is this memory, others will be compelled to share the same story with the same love in their hearts, as they heard and felt from the storyteller.
    I think it’s worth a shot.

    Liked by 2 people

    March 16, 2017
    • That comment encapsulates what I try to achieve. Because if by telling the stories with love they somehow adhere to others and stick to their hearts surely somehow those lives ripped apart, brutilised, extinguished in the most deplorable way are not in vain.

      Liked by 1 person

      March 16, 2017
      • There’s no somehow. Your stories draw people in with truth. Your heart is your pen. It’s aligned with love, honor, tragedy, reality and hope. It’s forever embedded in the reader’s heart. If it takes a community to teach them when to listen to their heart, then we, the community need to step up and proceed.

        Liked by 1 person

        March 17, 2017
      • You, my friend, my dear friend, you have it exactly right. And thank you

        Liked by 1 person

        March 17, 2017
  15. You cut to the heart, as you always do Osyth, when WILL we ever learn?

    Liked by 2 people

    March 16, 2017
    • I refuse to believe never though the evidence continually proved me wrong 🙁

      Liked by 3 people

      March 16, 2017
    • I refuse to believe never though the evidence continues to prove me wrong 🙁

      Liked by 1 person

      March 16, 2017
  16. A very powerful and thought provoking post. Sadly, nothing has changed. I volunteered with a charity in 2000 in Sarajevo, Bosnia where the hillsides were covered in white tombstones, and children could not play in the countryside for fear of landmines. I met those who survived amputations… Their spirits lit up my days…

    Liked by 2 people

    March 16, 2017
  17. I think each of us, at least the ones paying attention, have a spot or moment in time during this war or that that traps our soul, drags us into the depths of despair. I think we try to feel what it must have been like, try and lift some of the burden from those who may be still wandering the battlefield searching for a way out, a way home. For me it was the battle of Guadalcanal in the pacific. Every time I see a picture or watch a documentary about it I feel an almost insurmountable pull, a tremendous longing to stand on the beach, walk the jungle, try my best to soothe the poor souls that must still wander that island. If I can I will make it there before I die and do my small part for those who paid the ultimate price for what I have.

    Liked by 3 people

    March 16, 2017
    • You are so right and it is so right to keep that sympathy bearing in out hearts… I hope you will be able to visit and feel the earth beneath your feet, that blood soaked earth, as I am able to here. A strange wish some might say but respect and deference for those that have their all is enormously importany on a tiny human coil if we are to be worthy of anything. I think

      Liked by 3 people

      March 16, 2017
  18. I didn’t know this piece of history. Thank you for sharing it in such a moving way.

    Liked by 2 people

    March 16, 2017
    • Thank you for taking the time to read and thank you for your kind comment ….. it’s a story that can’t be overtold

      Liked by 1 person

      March 16, 2017
  19. So moved by this Osyth. Your tribute serves as a memorial that is truly universal in its message. I always leave your posts grateful for the beauty of your words and images. I have to add that your “protective bubble reserved for the newly amorous” is worthy of a place in the Oxford Book of Quotations 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    March 17, 2017
    • Thank you Andrew … that means all the more for coming from you who I know to be thoughtful, sensitive and intellectually smart. On an entirely selfish note I would for happy if I made OBQ 😊

      Liked by 1 person

      March 17, 2017
  20. When I first learned of what part of the world you were in, I recognized the name, I then took to google to remind me of what I had forgotten from my studies….I wipe away the tears as I read your post…even though the pictures are beautiful, you can’t help but think back to the pain and suffering that took place there….it really is a beautiful place…and I still want to get on the big jet and come play….LOL thanks for the wonderful post….had to lighten it up alittle…my husband is wondering why I am getting all teared up….xxxxxxxxxxxxkat

    Liked by 1 person

    March 17, 2017
    • Thank you for being such a dear kind FEELING soul. It’s hard not to weep for such a place. And there are far to many still suffering as yet more futile wars are inflicted on the innocents xxx

      Liked by 1 person

      March 17, 2017
  21. Poignant… What DID we learn? And perhaps lying down in a bed of flowers helps to comfort and be with the pain of the unanswered.

    Liked by 1 person

    March 17, 2017
    • Clearly we learned nothing except that there are the tiny green shoots of those that do remember, do consider and try to keep the lessons ticked safe in out hearts. I am regularly to be found lying in beds of flowers…. I find them to be balm to my aching grieving heart… aching and grieving for the innocents still mien down by the feckless

      Liked by 2 people

      March 17, 2017
  22. A powerful post, illustrated by equally powerful photos. I was born in Dover eight years after the end of WW2 and grew up with many reminders of what it had done, but none as dramatic as this. Sadly, your final point is so right. Humankind carries on making the same mistakes.

    Like

    March 17, 2017
  23. Not only should we never forget, but we should regularly and actively remember. Thank you for keeping the ignition on remembrance. We cannot remove the badness from the world but we must remember the good and the brave

    Liked by 2 people

    March 20, 2017
    • Thank you. That is the perfect comment. I am proud to be on the same page in the same book as you xx

      Like

      March 21, 2017
  24. Not sure what post I featured the song, but will go back and see if my tags lead to an anti-war post. I wish we could see the “white dove sleep in the sand.”
    Fiona, you brought me to tears. The young and old don’t need another war, nor should this one have happened. If only someone would have stopped Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini in the very beginning and said, “Stop! We don’t want to go along with your maniacal actions!”
    If only other wars had never been. . .
    Just so much to see there and feel. I think I would hear voices if I ever went to the concentration camps’ locations. *shivering.
    Hugs to you for sharing this powerful post, dear Fiona. ❤ xo

    Liked by 2 people

    March 21, 2017
    • Thank you. Sometimes I think, however painful, things have to be said. I try to be upbeat much of the time but on occasion it is important to give those bleak reminders. For the sake of the children. It is all I can do and sitting on my hands with my mouth taped is not the right thing. Peace to you. Love to you. May the good sense we share in some way prevail xx

      Liked by 2 people

      March 21, 2017
      • You chose the right message to deliver after visiting such a place soaked in blood. I would appreciate honesty any or every day; over no thoughtful or pensive moments. I hope my message was supportive! I had Mary Travers on one blog and Bob Dylan in another connected to “Blowin’ in the Wind” on my blog. Songs are at beginning of my tags. This was a wonderful post with a poignant warning.
        Another song I love is, “Peace Train.” Peace and love are the answer, the Beatles lead my morning today, “All We Need is Love!” xoxoxo

        Liked by 1 person

        March 21, 2017
      • I tell people that Love really IS all we need and I do believe it …. we can ride on the Peace Train together and we can drop these warnings in when it is appropriate. Your message was very very supportive and I am, as ever, warmed by your kindness and gentle spirit xx

        Liked by 1 person

        March 21, 2017
      • Oh, good! The truth cannot be swept under the rug!! hugs xo I like the idea of gathering our friends and family on one big, joyous Peace train!

        Liked by 1 person

        March 21, 2017
      • I think we should put our collective hearts together and see if we can’t come up with a blogging idea that gets things started …. let’s give it some thought. Although I know from my views vs likes on this post that many have found it uncomfortable and are uneasy about commenting and liking as freely as they normally do, I am certain that given the right conditions on our Train we would find so many friends of the same mind and heart and it would be a beautiful thing to do ❤️ 🚂 ✌️

        Liked by 1 person

        March 21, 2017
      • Woo-woo! Climb aboard! Maybe they got busy. I find my posts gather speed, sowikl this one, Fiona! ❤
        (Thank you for your sweet words! Off to work I must carry on. . .)

        Liked by 1 person

        March 21, 2017
  25. Your post has made my eyes flow over with tears, as do all things, stories etc that show us the dark side of humanity. And there is a dark side, and I can´t stand it when people think by ignoring it it will just go away – it won´t! Words like yours are so much needed, even more so with every decade that separates us from this war, I believe. The burden of history is heavy, especially here in Germany, and it can only get lighter and be shared when every single person is aware of it and determined to never let it happen again. Ignorance is the tool of evil, and sadly, it spreads like nothing else… Your post is the perfect anti-dote for it! Thank you! xxx

    Liked by 2 people

    March 21, 2017
    • Oh Sarah …. what a beautiful comment. Every word you write is exactly right. We cannot just sweep things under the carpet and pretend they didn’t happen or that they won’t happen again. Educating people, taking them by the hand and showing them the truth, that is what settles the seeds of resolve to ensure we don’t take the darkest roads again. What happened, happened for a reason. Evil does not just appear, it grows insidiously and it is only by understanding what has gone before that we can be prepared when it begins to take root. You are one, very special person and I am so glad that our paths have crossed. Xxxx

      Liked by 2 people

      March 21, 2017
      • My dear Osyth, your words have humbled me and my mind and heart sings from joy that we have found each other and share so many thoughts and feelings. I´m so very, very happy about this! 🙂 It´s not often that I feel that connected to someone, especially someone I haven´t even met yet in person! You are one truly and magnificent person and I´m so glad to call you my friend! 🙂 Your words and thoughts ring so deep and true of your awesome personality… I feel so blessed with our friendship. 🙂
        Wish you a beautiful and creative weekend – another trip to la Maison? 😉 If so, I wish you even more strength to accomplish everything you´ve set your mind upon this weekend! xxxx

        Liked by 1 person

        March 23, 2017
      • All I can say is that I echo your words. Life is brighter with you as a friend. This weekend we are in Grenoble and hoping to explore more of the history and get out for a good hike. I hope yours is sparkling and full of good things xxxxxxz

        Liked by 1 person

        March 23, 2017
      • Now you´ve made me beam like a lighthouse! 😀 Although it´s raining outside, the day couldn’t be any brighter!! 🙂 Hope the weather gods will grant you a beautiful hike and I look already forward to your pictures and stories! 🙂 xxxxxxxx ❤

        Liked by 1 person

        March 23, 2017
  26. Nice BLOG!!! ADD my BLOG too!!! Kisses!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    March 22, 2017
  27. For some reasons, I missed this post last week. Your pictures are beautiful against the sad story of WWII. I am totally with you about the lessons not being absorbed and I am quite worried with the new state of the world. We simply need to continue to question everything and hope that one day the world will come to its sense before disaster strikes…(Suzanne)

    Liked by 1 person

    March 23, 2017
    • I share your concern. Yesterday was just another example and however many people say bravely ‘This will just make us stronger’ doesn’t make me feel better. The issues seem in many ways parallel to those that led to the second of the world wars and it is scary seeing so many rallying around extreme leaders whilst simultaneously condemning the extreme beliefs of the terrorists. We need to look back dispassionately and collectively and understand history whilst firmly vowing that we will not make such mistakes again. But I don’t believe that most are and it fills me with fear for the future.

      Like

      March 23, 2017
      • Agree with you though I am trying to stay positive and hope that humanity will wake up soon and avert the disaster train that seems to be coming. Though after reading the last book of the Israeli historian, Yuval Noah Harari – Homo Deus: A brief history of tomorrow, we seem to be doomed!

        Liked by 1 person

        March 23, 2017
      • Probably best I give that a miss for a while… my accustomed positive halo seems to be struggling g to shine at the moment. 🙁

        Like

        March 23, 2017
  28. Wow Fiona, a powerful post! Thanks for writing this!Your writing captures emotions and facts that keep us interested! xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    March 23, 2017
  29. Reblogged this on writeonthebeach and commented:
    Something a bit different for this week. A very powerful and thoughtful blog from one of my favourite bloggers. Made more poignant I think when you consider what is happening in the world at the moment.

    Liked by 1 person

    March 27, 2017
  30. Have just reblogged this O. Thank you. Sorry it is a bit later than anticipated I had an unfortunate encounter with a plate of mussels that laid me low for a week.!

    Liked by 1 person

    March 27, 2017
    • Noooooo …. moule poisoning is dreadful. Go lightly as you recover and thank you again for this. I am rather overwhelmed

      Like

      March 27, 2017
      • Don’t be. I’m a big fan and I’m trying to reach a wider blogging audience as part of my book launch strategy.

        Liked by 1 person

        March 27, 2017
      • Me likee. Feel free to email me details of the launch …. of course I shall want to buy the offending tome but once read, I’m quite good at making the noise on various platforms – FaceBook, LinkedIn and Twitter mostly.

        Like

        March 27, 2017
  31. I enjoyed reading your post…and i must say i enjoyed reading the comments…you have such brilliant and engaging followers..

    Liked by 1 person

    April 5, 2017
    • Aren’t they the best? I am constantly amazed that anyone wants to comment at all but it is SO lovely when people want to really get stuck into the commentary and I do hope that others meet up through the little threads that snake along behind the posts 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      April 6, 2017
      • I honestly enjoyed reading the comment section as.much as i love the post…it is wonderful to be part of you followers…

        Liked by 1 person

        April 6, 2017
  32. Gosh Osyth – I saw this last week but didn’t have time to sit down and read it – I knew I wanted to come back to it and I’m so glad I have.. I’m sitting here now with tears rolling down my cheeks.. you are facing a family – a grandmother, her two daughters and all the children of one of them including a baby lying side by side, their lives extinguished mercilessly.   Every single one of them.   See it, feel it and tell me, tell me not to weep…… So so sad – I haven’t got the words to express the true horror of what these people experienced on their last days on Earth.. and it serves to remind us that we must honor our lives because we are lucky to be here because our heritage wasn’t wiped out… A beautiful piece of writing and such an important reminder and you’re right – why do we never learn.. we only have to switch on the news to see that these crises continue around our World today.. Syria, Yemen … and the list goes on…..
    xxx

    Liked by 1 person

    April 11, 2017
    • Thank you Wendy. There is nothing I can add except that at least by linking hands virtually and expressing our deep regret and disgust and appreciating and valuing what we have, we are honouring those who live in the continuing eye of the futile storm of conflict xxx

      Liked by 1 person

      April 12, 2017
      • Absolutely Osyth.. It’s incredibly sad and you’re right – utterly futile… I’m definitely holding hands with you on this… xxx

        Liked by 1 person

        April 12, 2017

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