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If youre afraid of butter, use cream!

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Osyth

The very first walk I ever took in Grenoble was a tentative totter up to le Bastille which sits some 400 metres above the city.  I casually strolled up through le Jardins de Dauphines and found myself facing Philis.  Philis is rather arresting in a slightly aggressive warrior sort of way poised casually astride her rearing steed brandishing one-handed some sort of lethal rapierClearly this is a woman to laugh in the face of weak-minded affectations of femininity like sitting side-saddle or wearing frocks and who would not shirk from skewering all comers with her dirk.  In fairness and for the aforementioned reasons, I did not instantly realise she is a she, portrayed as she is as a rather masculine, if a little foppishly dressed fighter. Of course, mens’ fashions were, a little frou frou in 17th Century France. I inched closer and it was clear that I was, indeed, beholding a gallant gal.

Osyth Statue
Philis is a legend.  We all know what legends are, I hope.  Legends are stories that are so old that no one can remember if they are true or not.  Keep that front of  mind as we sashay elegantly forward.  Philis was born  Philippe de la Tour du Pin de la Charce in 1645, the fifth child of high falootin’ tootin’ parents – hardly a surprise given the full mouthful of a name they blithely gave their infant.  At the age of six her Aunt, a poet of some acclaim, took her to watch a series of Roman plays in Nyon and SO amazed was the girl named Phil that she promptly declared she was changing her name that very minute to the entirely Roman Philis.  Which, let’s face facts was probably just a clever ruse to get a more girlie name.  However, it became clear that she had no intention of being a damsel, even though her newly acquired  name was a little less … manly, more maidenly.  She  competed brilliantly with her brothers  and became a breathtaking horsewoman and dashing blade wielder.  She fell in love with a Catholic, became betrothed when he promised to convert to the Protestant version of exactly the same faith as his but, a little  caddishly one might observe, he reneged on his pledge.  She then did what any self-respecting jilted girl might resolve to do … she became an even better horsewoman and an even greater blade and vowed that she would not so much as look at another man except down on him from high on her hot-blooded stallion.

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This area of France is historically named le Dauphiné which means ‘dolphin’ and accounts for the fact that though we are 275km (170 miles) from our nearest coastline,  there are an awful lot of dolphin references around the city.   Forward to  1690 and enter stage right or left depending whether you are facing North or South, Victor Amedée II. You are absolved of any guilt for not remotely realising there was a Victor Amedée I, even though it actually turns out that, in fact there was also a further Victor Amedée imaginatively named  Victor Amedée III.  Victor’s correct title was Victor Amedée Duc de Savoie.  Savoie was next door to le Dauphiné (it still is) but he had absolutely no intention of being an affable neighbour.  He far preferred the idea of snatching the Dauphiné lands to add to his already bulging, to the point of vulgar, property portfolio.  According to her legend, Philis organised a résistance and heading an army of peasants she successfully saved her region from the marauding Victor.   The rather mealy-mouthed scolars who variously argued the story for over 100 years,  claim she simply fronted a band of looters who often came here “to collect contributions from citizens of local towns and villages” and that it was thanks to her relations with the French Royal Court in Paris that she was ever rewarded with a pension from King Louis XIV.  Whichever version you choose, by the 19th Century her myth had mushroomed and for a while she was called Jean d’Arc du Dauphiné.  Several historians have muted her laurels but she is still proudly acclaimed Heroine de Dauphine on her statue.  I know which version I prefer.

And as this guest piece is being written for a cookery blog I thought it only fitting that I give you an appropriate recipe: Le vrai Gratin Dauphinois.  You will kindly notice that a real Gratin Dauphinois has no cheese in it even though it is said that Escoffier experimented and was rumoured to occasionally add a little.  Like a Quiche Lorraine, here in this Gratin’s spiritual home, the real deal has no cheese and that is how I infinitely prefer it.   If you doubt me, give it a try – I promise it is a sumptuous experience that belies its meager list of ingredients.

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Ingredients:
Potatoes – not waxy new ones.  King Edwards are perfect
Double cream or Crême Fraiche – you can dilute with milk if you prefer.   I don’t prefer.
Garlic
Freshly ground nutmeg
Butter
Freshly ground black pepper
Salt – if your butter is unsalted
Method:

  1.  Preheat oven to 150C
  2. Butter a shallow but not too shallow oven-proof dish
  3. Peel (reserve the peelings) enough potatoes to fill the dish when thinly sliced
  4. Rub with a cut clove of garlic
  5. Peel, chop and smoosh the garlic
  6. Slice potatoes into slender rounds – some use a mandolin, I don’t have one so I just keep them as thin as I can without adding slivers of finger – never elegant
  7. Layer the potatoes with a sprinkling of garlic, grated nutmeg and ground pepper
  8. Repeat til all the potatoes are used – three layers for my dish
  9. Dot with butter (mine has salt crystals so I don’t add salt)
  10. Drench it in cream – I used 50cl
  11. Bake for 2½ hours until bubbling, unctuous and smelling like your life depends on eating it.  In fairness, your life WILL be incomplete if you don’t.

Osyth4
I served ours with green beans and Diot.  Diots are a traditional Savoyard sausage.  I apologise for being unable to resist the irony …

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PS:  Eat only fruit for many days afterwards as a penance for the ambrosial decadence of the dish and to notionally save the impending blockade in your arteries.  But not before you have triumphantly taken up the saved peelings, coated them in a little oil of choice (always olive chez moi) and a good grind of black pepper.  Or frankly whatever you like to season them, who am I to dictate to you?  Pop them in a highish oven for 10 minutes.  Recline on sofa or chaise longue and idly nibble as a little snackette with your choice of libation.

Osyth6

PS:  The title is Julia Child – une heroine culinaire

43 Comments Post a comment
  1. And…I can thank you for some of the future clogged arteries I will have.

    Liked by 1 person

    September 6, 2017
    • But they will be happy clogged arteries, I promise 😉

      Liked by 3 people

      September 6, 2017
      • Oh, they will be – and they will join all the other butter- and cream-clogged arteries I already have. On the plus side, those are all a result of so, so much good food, they have been well worth it.

        Liked by 1 person

        September 8, 2017
      • A girl after my own heart 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        September 8, 2017
  2. Nom, nom, nom!

    Liked by 2 people

    September 6, 2017
  3. I haven’t made it for ages but perhaps I will try it for Teddy sometime…

    Liked by 1 person

    September 6, 2017
  4. Are you psychic……. I made this for supper tonight and then found your post while in recovery.

    Liked by 2 people

    September 7, 2017
  5. so decadently divine and sinisterly humorous! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    September 7, 2017
  6. beautiful capture……

    Liked by 1 person

    September 7, 2017
  7. Perfect recipe for the cold days that are threatening to come now! Who cares about those clogged arteries? As long as my belly is happy 😀 Love it! xxxxxxxxxxx

    Liked by 3 people

    September 7, 2017
    • I’ll raise my fork to that! We’ve discussed the importance before of not waging a war of attrition on yourself and I do absolutely believe it. Moderation in all things – that’s the key! Xxxxxxx

      Liked by 2 people

      September 7, 2017
  8. extolled you on Esmé’s blog 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    September 7, 2017
  9. I have to go and see! I am sure it is amazing!

    Liked by 2 people

    September 7, 2017
  10. Afraid of butter, moi? Give me your cream, your potatoes…I’ll thin my blood with red wine! x

    Liked by 3 people

    September 8, 2017
  11. jdraymaine #

    Very nice! I shall attempt this sumptuous dish at the ruse of my galley upon completion! I may even attire myself in a completly frilly costume of said timeline just for fun! (Photos to come!)

    Liked by 2 people

    September 9, 2017
    • It is so little effort for such a luscious payback … I hope you will enjoy it. All you need to follow is a good cognac 😉 The costume is quite pirate-like so I think it would be entirely appropriate for your galley! Photos? Yes please!!!

      Liked by 1 person

      September 9, 2017
      • jdraymaine #

        I never thought of the pirate theme! Great idea!🔪

        Liked by 1 person

        September 9, 2017
  12. OMG I daren’t look at this potato recipe.. xx

    Liked by 2 people

    September 9, 2017
    • Ha! Save it for high days and holidays and follow my advice to revert immediately afterwards to a fruit and lettuce diet for many days! Xx

      Like

      September 11, 2017
  13. I answered this lovey post over on the guest blog !! XXXXXXXkat

    Liked by 2 people

    September 12, 2017
    • Thank you so much. So glad you enjoyed it 🙂 xxxx

      Like

      September 12, 2017
  14. I like your post 😊.

    Liked by 2 people

    September 12, 2017
    • Thank you so much, @loshame …. it is so kind of you to take the time to drop in and leave a comment. I hope I will welcome you as a regular visitor in the future and in the meantime I wish you a very happy week 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      September 12, 2017
      • Take a look on my last post and follow me if you like it 😀.

        Liked by 1 person

        September 12, 2017
  15. I made your dauphinois last Thursday Osyth. Instead of fruit I followed up with a big pot of lentil soup 🌼🌼🌼

    Liked by 2 people

    September 13, 2017
    • This makes me SO happy! Lentils are amongst my truest of true loves 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      September 17, 2017
      • Mine too. 🌼

        Liked by 1 person

        September 17, 2017
      • By the way, your book arrived with my Husband this week – I am going to read it before sending it to my sister-in-law 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

        September 17, 2017
  16. Brilliant. I do hope you enjoy it. All feedback is greatly appreciated. 🌼🌼🌼

    Liked by 2 people

    September 17, 2017
  17. Your dauphinois sounds decadent! But so worth it! Lovely photos, too. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    September 18, 2017
    • Honestly, Tonya it is SO decadent and for such a tiny effort. I’m glad you liked the pictures …. this is a pretty city 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      September 18, 2017
  18. your very title has reminded me of THE famous Julia Child – another American(Cali gal!) who lived in Paris… what a great lady!!!(almost 1,90m!) – you may have watched the movie dedicated to her life with THE exceptional Meryl Streep & Amy Adams… 🙂
    * * *
    unfortunately no butter, no cream for I’ve been intolerant to both gluten and dairy for several years, et… si je fais des écarts, je les ressens “grave”, hélas!!!

    Liked by 2 people

    September 28, 2017
    • It is a Julia Child quote … I love her and adored Meryl Streep’s portrayal in the movie. Food intolerances are a note there is no doubt but I know from following your delicious foodie pics on Facebook that you find many things to compensate 🙂

      Like

      September 28, 2017

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